Wednesday, September 26, 2012

To the rescue!

Another drawing commissioned 
by our friends at Attfield Associates.
If you're a damsel or dude in (computer) distress, 
Kate and Ed will ride to your rescue! 


Copyright © 2012 Cheryl Coville



Sunday, September 23, 2012

Sunny September Sunday


Most of us sunbathe in July and August, but not Cassie. 
From now throughout the winter, this will be her favourite morning activity.
Like the quilt? It's one our mother made.
Cassie thinks it's very comfy.

Happy Sunny Sunday, to all!



Friday, September 21, 2012

A turtleneck sweater for Paddy



Today, being the first day of fall, we need to start thinking about Paddy's winter wardrobe. Here he is looking dapper in a warm turtleneck. Ignore the initial. It's really his cousin, Bernard's sweater, but it's really a good colour for Paddy, don't you think?

~ Happy First Day of Fall, everyone!

Friday, September 14, 2012

Anybody else smell smoke?

Copyright © 2012 Cheryl Coville


Another in a series of PSAs for Attfield Associates. If you ever come upon this scene in your home, you'll need them ... and probably a cat, too.




Wednesday, September 12, 2012

What is a MOOC?

We're still floundering a bit, trying to find our feet again after this summer's Big Life Changes. We're sure we'll get back on track soon enough. In the meantime, we soldier on.

On Sunday, we were fortunate to hear an hour-long piece on Sunday Edition (CBC Radio) about MOOCs. That acronym (gotta love acronyms) stands for Massive Online Open Course. There's an attempt to democratize (great word!) learning by making available FOR FREE courses and lectures from some of the best learning institutions around the world. We've signed up for a 10 week course in Modern and Contemporary American Poetry from the University of Pennsylvania. It's been 40 years since we sat in a university lecture hall, but we are finding this method of study very enjoyable. The course just started so if anyone else is interested, please join us. There are 30,000 other students there already. We're starting with Emily Dickinson. How can you go wrong starting with her?

Copyright © Cheryl Coville 2011

I dwell in Possibility –
A fairer House than Prose –
More numerous of Windows –
Superior – for Doors –

Of Chambers as the Cedars –
Impregnable of eye –
And for an everlasting Roof
The Gambrels of the Sky –

Of Visitors – the fairest –
For Occupation – This –
The spreading wide my narrow Hands
To gather Paradise –

(Emily Dickinson 1830-1886)



Thursday, September 6, 2012

More egg cosies

Grandma Coco has one glaring fault ... well, one among many, we suppose ... she finds it really, really hard to do the same thing over and over again. Oddly, she never suffers from SSS (Second Sock Syndrome) because first you do the Right Sock and then you do the Left Sock. (For variety, she often resorts to knitting the Left Sock first.)

We loved knitting those bunny egg cosies (who wouldn't?). They're adorable. However, 6 was all we had in us. Our friend, being very agreeable as she is, said 6 of another design would be fine. So, we made these:




Not nearly so cute but maybe slightly more suitable for a more formal dining experience. They remind us of those cloche hats the flappers wore in the '20s. Thoroughly Modern Milly hats. These are our very own invention, so we're able to give you the pattern in case you need an egg cosy. (You never know. You might!) The bottom features a picot edging which is really simple to do and we embroidered some flowers and leaves for decoration at the end.

We used leftover sock yarn/fingering weight yarn and 2.75 mm double point needles. We cast on 40 stitches provisionally. That means we crocheted a length of contrasting coloured yarn first. We chained 45 stitches or so. We picked ups stitches with our main coloured yarn by knitting into each of 40 loops on the crochet chain. Arrange stitches on 3 needles. Join in a circle. That's 40 stitches total.

Knit 3 rounds evenly.
Next round: (K2 tog, YO), repeat to end of round.
Knit 3 more rounds.
Next round: Knit each stitch together with one live stitch from the provisional cast on. This causes the edge to fold up on itself like a hem. Very cool. Very easy. Very neat.

Knit 1 more round evenly and very carefully, remove the waste yarn.

Begin the striping:
Knit 2 rounds of a contrasting colour
Knit 2 rounds of the main colour
Knit 2 rounds of a contrasting colour
Don't worry about cutting the yarns between colour row changes. The yarn will float easily over such a short distance. You can cut the contrasting yarn now, leaving 10 inches or so for darning in at the end.

Continue knitting evenly with the main colour yarn until the work measures 2 inches from the fold of the picot edge.

Start decreasing for the top of the egg:
Rnd. 1: (K2, K2 tog), repeat to end of round.
Knit 3 rounds evenly.
Rnd. 5: (K1, K2 tog), repeat to end of round.
Rnd. 6: Knit evenly.
Rnd. 7: (K2 tog), repeat to end of round.

Cut the yarn, leaving about 10 inches and draw the tail through all the stitches. Pull up tight. Finish neatly and decorate with a little wool embroidery, if you like.

Now, who's for a boiled egg?